We are pleased to announce that Insight Policy Research was acquired by Westat, effective June 15, 2022. Branded as “Westat Insight,” we are currently operating as a wholly owned subsidiary of Westat and continue to provide our clients with the best-in-class services they have come to expect. Our combined experience now offers expanded expertise in health, education, and social policy as well as deeper methodological skills in survey research, evaluation, data analytics, and technical assistance. Learn more here.
We are pleased to announce that Insight Policy Research was acquired by Westat, effective June 15, 2022. Branded as “Westat Insight,” we are currently operating as a wholly owned subsidiary of Westat and continue to provide our clients with the best-in-class services they have come to expect. Our combined experience now offers expanded expertise in health, education, and social policy as well as deeper methodological skills in survey research, evaluation, data analytics, and technical assistance. Learn more here.
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Reports and Publications

Each of Insight’s products is designed to convey complex information clearly, effectively, and concisely, particularly to nontechnical audiences. Our reports and other publications are tailored to ensure research evidence informs public policy and program implementation. We aim to exceed client expectations with every product delivered.

Reports and Publications

Maternal Opioid Misuse (MOM) Model Evaluation Pre-Implementation Evaluation Report

The MOM Model supports interventions designed to improve quality of care and reduce costs for pregnant and postpartum Medicaid beneficiaries with opioid use disorder and their infants. The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation is supporting awardees in eight States (Colorado, Indiana, Maine, Maryland, New Hampshire, Tennessee, Texas, and West Virginia) to implement the MOM Model with one or more care delivery partners. This first report describes how awardees and care delivery partners are implementing their MOM Model interventions, common challenges they have faced, and early successes.

Feasibility Study on Implementing SNAP in Puerto Rico: Implementation Plan

Insight food and nutrition experts developed an implementation plan describing the steps Puerto Rico and FNS must take to design and implement SNAP in Puerto Rico. The plan includes estimates of the timeline and costs for implementation. Given the unprecedented requirement of starting SNAP from scratch, the study team estimated that full implementation compliant with current SNAP rules and regulations could take up to 10 years to achieve. The study team also estimated that SNAP would serve approximately 860,000 households in Puerto Rico, a 19.0% increase over Puerto Rico’s current Nutrition Assistance Program (NAP) and implementation would cost between $300 and $400 million (over 84% dedicated to developing compliant data systems).

The study team drew on several data sources to inform the implementation plan: (1) an environmental scan and document review; (2) interviews with FNS staff from the National Office and the Mid-Atlantic Regional Office; and (3) interviews with ADSEF staff and other stakeholders in Puerto Rico, including authorized NAP retailers, the Financial Oversight and Management Board, community-based organizations, employers, partner government agencies, and emergency management partners. Additionally, the study team:

  • calculated participation estimates using a microsimulation model that applied SNAP eligibility requirement parameters to 2019 Puerto Rico Community Survey (PRCS) data. We then applied assumptions about likely participation rates to estimate the number of SNAP participants and resultant caseworkers needed.
  • estimated the costs of SNAP implementation using extant information regarding ADSEF labor, FNS labor, consultants, data systems development, and other direct costs such as translation of program materials and a public communications campaign.
  • estimated the ongoing SNAP administrative costs using annual SNAP administration costs across 10 administrative functions from a set of State agencies with caseload sizes, service delivery models, and policy options similar to what is expected in Puerto Rico.

Feasibility Study on Implementing SNAP in Puerto Rico: Final Report

Insight’s food and nutrition experts prepared a comprehensive report to Congress comparing the characteristics and requirements of Puerto Rico’s current Nutrition Assistance Program (NAP) and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). To implement SNAP in Puerto Rico, several actions would be required: U.S. Congress must first provide authority to Puerto Rico to operate SNAP, the Government of Puerto Rico must commit funding for its share of administrative costs, and the USDA Food and Nutrition Service must work closely with Puerto Rico to develop new systems and procedures and ensure the program meets federal requirements before roll-out. The report describes NAP and SNAP operations including eligibility and benefit determinations, data systems, work requirements, employment and training, and program integrity; and details facilitators and barriers to implementation in Puerto Rico.

The study found that implementing SNAP in Puerto Rico would significantly improve and stabilize nutrition assistance for most residents. The estimated total cost during the implementation period is $341 to $426 million and the estimated cost of administering SNAP in Puerto Rico is $249 million to $414 million per year, and the cost of benefits is $4.5 billion annually (both costs are in 2031 dollars). Options are provided for Congress to consider that would ease the transition and facilitate implementation in Puerto Rico.

The Use of Supervised Job Search, Job Search Training, and Integrated Job Search in SNAP E&T: Three Case Studies

The Food Security Act of 1985 established the SNAP E&T program to help SNAP recipients gain the skills, training, and experience needed to achieve economic self-sufficiency. Of the possible program components, states most commonly offer supervised job search assistance and job search training. Despite their use, however, little is known about state agency implementation of these components; specific activities offered by SNAP E&T providers; and the short and long-term economic effects of participation. This study helps to fill this knowledge gap through case studies of three States with different approaches to E&T implementation.

The study team drew on several sources to answer these research questions, including: (1) an environmental scan and literature review; (2) virtual site visit interviews with State SNAP, local SNAP office, and E&T provider staff in three States; (3) phone interviews with current and recent E&T participants; and (4) analysis of SNAP administrative, E&T and unemployment insurance wage data.

Across States and E&T providers, the most common job search activities were resume or cover letter assistance, mock interviews, and individualized job search plan development. While quantitative findings suggest jobs obtained after participating in these activities are unlikely to enable long-term self-sufficiency, interviewed participants reported high levels of satisfaction with the services they received. Respondents noted they were able to find employment because of the assistance they received from their E&T provider and were grateful to be working with a caseworker who helped motivate them during their job search.

National- and State-Level Estimates of WIC Eligibility and Program Reach, 2019

This report estimates the number of women, infants, and children eligible to receive benefits from the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) in 2019. It includes WIC eligibility estimates for the nation and by region, State, and U.S. territory. The national estimates use data from the Current Population Survey’s Annual Social and Economic Supplement (CPS-ASEC) to create a national estimate of infants and children eligible for WIC and the average monthly number of infants, children, and pregnant and postpartum women eligible for WIC. The State estimates use data from the American Community Survey (ACS) data and each State’s share of the ACS-based estimates. Estimates for the U.S. territories use the Puerto Rico Community Survey data and Census Bureau International Database to estimate WIC eligibility in Puerto Rico and the other U.S. territories, respectively. The 2016 through 2018 eligibility estimates presented in this report were also updated from the estimates presented in the 2018 report to incorporate improved methods for estimating WIC eligibility among infants (see appendix E in volume II for more information).

National- and State-Level Estimates of WIC Eligibility and Program Reach, 2018 (With Updated Estimates for 2016 and 2017)

This report estimates the number of women, infants, and children eligible to receive benefits from the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) in 2018, with updated estimates for 2016 and 2017. It includes WIC eligibility estimates for the nation and by region, state, and U.S. territory. The national estimates use data from the Current Population Survey’s Annual Social and Economic Supplement (CPS-ASEC) to create a national estimate of infants and children eligible for WIC and the average monthly number of infants, children, and pregnant and postpartum women eligible for WIC. The state estimates use data from the American Community Survey (ACS) data and each state’s share of the ACS-based estimates. Estimates for the U.S. territories use the Puerto Rico Community Survey data and Census Bureau International Database to estimate WIC eligibility in Puerto Rico and the other U.S. territories, respectively. In the 2018 report, the 2016 and 2017 estimates were updated to use the new CPS-ASEC processing system.

National- and State-Level Estimates of WIC Eligibility and Program Reach, 2017

This report estimates the number of women, infants, and children eligible to receive benefits from the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) in 2017. It includes WIC eligibility estimates for the nation and by region, state, and U.S. territory. The national estimates use data from the Current Population Survey’s Annual Social and Economic Supplement to create a national estimate of infants and children eligible for WIC and the average monthly number of infants, children, and pregnant and postpartum women eligible for WIC. The state estimates use data from the American Community Survey (ACS) data and each state’s share of the ACS-based estimates. Estimates for the U.S. territories use the Puerto Rico Community Survey data and Census Bureau International Database to estimate WIC eligibility in Puerto Rico and the other U.S. territories, respectively.

National- and State-Level Estimates of WIC Eligibility and Program Reach 2015

This report estimates the number of women, infants, and children eligible to receive benefits from the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) in 2015. It includes WIC eligibility estimates for the nation and by region, state, and U.S. territory. The national estimates use data from the Current Population Survey’s Annual Social and Economic Supplement to create a national estimate of infants and children eligible for WIC and the average monthly number of infants, children, and pregnant and postpartum women eligible for WIC. The state estimates use data from the American Community Survey (ACS) data and each state’s share of the ACS-based estimates. Estimates for the U.S. territories use the Puerto Rico Community Survey data and Census Bureau International Database to estimate WIC eligibility in Puerto Rico and the other U.S. territories, respectively.

National- and State-Level Estimates of WIC Eligibility and Program Reach, 2016

This report estimates the number of women, infants, and children eligible to receive benefits from the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) in 2016. It includes WIC eligibility estimates for the nation and by region, state, and U.S. territory. The national estimates use data from the Current Population Survey’s Annual Social and Economic Supplement to create a national estimate of infants and children eligible for WIC and the average monthly number of infants, children, and pregnant and postpartum women eligible for WIC. The state estimates use data from the American Community Survey (ACS) data and each state’s share of the ACS-based estimates. Estimates for the U.S. territories use the Puerto Rico Community Survey data and Census Bureau International Database to estimate WIC eligibility in Puerto Rico and the other U.S. territories, respectively.

SNAP Model Notice Toolkit

This toolkit includes a comprehensive set of tools designed to help SNAP state agencies improve their SNAP notices. Specifically, the toolkit enables state agencies to evaluate the SNAP notices they send to clients, make targeted improvements work within SNAP system constraints, and comply with federal policy. The toolkit includes model notices with examples of plain language and formatting that the agencies can adapt to fit their own needs and several customizable tools to help promote continuous improvement practices. The tools focus on 10 types of SNAP notices; however, many of the tools are helpful in making changes to other types of client communications.